Committee Fetes Three Business Leaders at Los Angeles Conference

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

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Stewart Kwoh, Ang Lee, Joan Chen, and Liam McGee

Conf_art_2A trio of business leaders received awards for Business Excellence, Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy, and Leadership for Advancing U.S.-China Relations at the Committee’s 17th Annual Conference Gala Awards Dinner on April 17.   

Bank of America won the Business Excellence award, which was presented to Liam McGee, President of Global Consumer and Small Business Banking, by Conference Co-Chair Stewart Kwoh, President and Executive Director, Asian American Pacific Legal Center (APALC).  Kwoh praised Bank of America for its excellent consumer service, especially to Chinese and Asian Americans in California, as well as its innovative projects in these communities.  Kwoh, who sits on the Bank of America Consumer Advisory Council, said that the Bank had helped APALC produce a demographic profile of Asian Americans that has given local leaders a tool to understand the people they serve.   He singled out McGee as “a truly caring and courageous leader” who helped recruit Chinese American leadership for United Way campaigns in Los Angeles (Dominic Ng, Andrew Cherng, and Donald Tang chaired the campaigns in three consecutive years). 

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Quincy Jones on Darfur and the Olympics: Making a Difference by Staying in the Game

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

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Quincy Jones

Conf_logoIn his keynote speech to the Committee of 100 on April 19, music impresario Quincy Jones spoke publicly for the first time on why he is continuing his role as artistic advisor to the Beijing Olympics while using his personal influence to press the Chinese government to be a peacemaker in Darfur. 

“Over the past couple of months, I’ve received dozens of protest letters from various groups, here and abroad, begging me to boycott the Beijing Olympics.  The pressure from all directions has been extremely intense.  But it’s not my intention to withdraw from the Olympics . . . because I care too much about Darfur and China and if I can stay in the game with others like us, I feel we can make a difference.”

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“Countries Don’t Make Products—Companies and People Do”—Mattel Chairman and CEO Robert Eckert

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

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Robert Eckert of Mattel.

Conf_logoJon Stewart called it “The Great Recall of China”–the media and political nightmare last summer suffered by Mattel, the largest toymaker, when it had to recall 20 million toys imported from China. 

Mattel’s Chairman and CEO Robert Eckert gave the opening keynote speech on April 17 to explain what happened, after showing clips of the media coverage he had to endure, from CNN’s Lou Dobbs to “The Daily Show.”

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Vulnerable U.S.-China Relationship Calls for American Political Leadership

May 2008 | By Alejandro Reyes and Jane Leung Larson

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Stapleton Roy and Juan Williams

Conf_logoThere is an urgent need for American leaders who can explain the role of globalization, the value of trade, and the importance of China without pandering to public fears, according to panelists speaking on “Leadership in Transition:  The Outlook for the U.S. and Greater China.”

“The vulnerabilities of the U.S.-China relationship because of broad-based public concern [about China and globalization] are really quite high,” said Geoffrey Garrett, President, Pacific Council on International Policy. “Somebody has got to do a better job of explaining issues to the public.” Garrett noted that surveys have shown that more and more Americans have become skeptical of globalization, which is supported mainly by highly educated elites. “Globalization is getting a bad rap in the U.S.,” Garrett said.  As for China, Garrett fears “a perfect, negative storm” in which economic and political concerns of Americans converge to create a dangerous situation. 

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Sovereign Wealth Funds Need Not Be Feared, Say Experts

May 2008 | By Alejandro Reyes and Jane Leung Larson

Sovereign_2Jesse Wang, China Investment Corporation.

Conf_logoSovereign wealth funds have been active global investors for many years and need not be feared, said experts on the conference panel, “Sovereign Wealth Fund Investment and Its Impact on Global Finance.”

“Sovereign wealth funds are a part of globalization,” said Jesse Wang, Deputy General Manager of China Investment Corporation (CIC). “China is actively integrated in this process.” Added Richard H. Clarida, Executive Vice President and Global Strategic Advisor at PIMCO: “We live in a world of incredible financial globalization. It’s really not appropriate to paint these funds with a broad brush and put all these investors in one category.”

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Ang Lee: Write Your Own Narrative!

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

Anglee_2Conf_logoTranscending culture has been film director Ang Lee’s trademark, achieving the highest critical acclaim for films with no Chinese content (Sense and Sensibility and Brokeback Mountain) and huge American audiences for his Chinese-language movies (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon).

Lee was Special Guest at the Committee’s Gala Dinner and Award Program and had an animated conversation with actress Joan Chen about his life and career during the Annual Conference.

“If I grew up in America, I probably wouldn’t be a filmmaker,” mused Lee.  His feeling of desperation after failing the college examination in Taiwan and trying to avoid military service led him to enter the art academy and study acting.  “Once I stood on stage, I knew that my life would be on stage, somewhere in the dark.”  Struggling with shyness and the confusion of trying to find himself, Lee found that “you can touch the real you by faking it,” which Lee says is the theme of his latest film, Lust, Caution.  Lee came to the U.S. to study theater at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne, but soon discovered that his poor English meant he wouldn’t be able to act.  He turned to directing films.  “Once I went to NYU Graduate Film School and made a movie, I knew it was my medium, better than acting.”

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The Making of Genius, Chinese American-Style: Marc Yu, Julie Su, and Steve Chen

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

Confbanner_6Adeline Yen Mah, a physician turned best-selling author (Falling Leaves), led an exploration of creativity and innovation with three young Chinese Americans whose personal genius emerged early in their lives.

 

Marc Yu

Marc Yu

The audience was awed by Marc Yu, only nine, a professional classical pianist who began his international performing career at age six.  Marc’s genius revealed itself when he was two and heard humming along with Beethoven symphonies.  He was soon taking piano lessons.  Marc played a moving piano concert followed by a technically demanding duet with his father, Chris Yu, on cello.  At home, Marc says he practices five to eight hours a day, and he enjoys it “tremendously because I always improve when I practice.”  His father joked about how demanding Marc is when they play duets:  “Mistakes are not tolerated!”  For fun, Marc said, “Recently I’ve been reading Shakespeare because it makes a deeper impression on me than going to movies.  And I love ping pong.” 

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A Chinese American Face for Public Diplomacy: Michelle Kwan

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

Kwan1_2Conf_logoMichelle Kwan was honored for the second time by the Committee of 100 at a private reception for C-100 corporate sponsors held at the Greystone Estate in Beverly Hills on April 18.  Kwan was only 14 when she won her first award from the Committee for exceptional athletic achievements.  Between 1995 and 2005, Kwan won more championships—43—than any other figure skater in U.S. history.

This year, Kwan, now 27, was presented with a C-100 award for Public Diplomacy.  In 2006, Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice appointed Kwan to be the first American Public Diplomacy Envoy, after she met her at a White House dinner for President Hu Jintao and learned that Kwan was studying political science and international studies at Rice’s alma mater, the University of Denver.   In her new role as a representative of the U.S. to the youth of the world, Kwan has visited China, Russia and Argentina.  She attended the Special Olympics in Shanghai last year and hopes to be at the summer Olympics in Beijing. 

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Courting the Chinese Market: Disney and Wal-Mart

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

ConfbannerJay Rasulo, Chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, and Thomas Mars, General Counsel for Wal-Mart, touted their companies’ progress in attracting the Chinese consumer at the Friday luncheon.

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Jay Rasulo, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts.

While Hong Kong Disneyland, which opened in 2005, greeted 10 million visitors in three years, Rasulo seemed most excited about the growing numbers of prosperous Chinese from the mainland who are traveling abroad, 10 million a year.  By 2015, he said, 100 million Chinese will be taking overseas trips.  This is possible because families earning only $6,000 to $10,000 annually have the savings to travel abroad.  Chinese most want to come to the U.S., above other countries, with New York City, Southern California and Las Vegas among the most desired destinations.

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Americans and Chinese Working Together to Strengthen Rule of Law in China

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May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Lew introduced his panel on “Rule of Law” in China by saying that no other topic was as important.  “It affects individual rights and society in general, it promotes the economy’s growth, and it promotes peace and justice.”   

Ronald Lew
Ronald Lew

Three of the panelists, including Lew, have been at the forefront of American efforts to help China better implement the rule of law.  Lew is chair of the Asia section of the Committee on International Judicial Relations and has been working for years with China’s judiciary in such diverse areas as intellectual property rights and criminal law.  Jeffrey Sean Lehman is the Chancellor and founding Dean of the Peking University School of Transnational Law, which will open this September with a class of 60 students who will earn an American-style Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD).  Karen Tse is CEO of International Bridges to Justice (IBJ– http://ibj.org/), a non-profit organization that has been helping China to build a fairer criminal justice system since 2001 (Lew and member Charlie Sie sit on the governing and advisory boards). 

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Iris Chang’s Dream Lives on in New Documentary–Nanking Director Bill Guttentag

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May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

Late Committee of 100 member Iris Chang was remembered at the Annual Conference with the appearance of Bill Guttentag, writer/director of the 2007 film, Nanking, who was standing in for Ted Leonsis, the film’s producer.  Producer Janet Yang introduced Chang’s parents, Shau-Jin and Ying-Ying Chang, who were attending the conference and had first inspired Iris to take on the difficult and, in the West, little-known, subject.

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Media Blamed for Exaggerating Chinese Food and Product Safety Worries

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May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson and Alejandro Reyes

Concern about the safety of food and products from China raised by last year’s massive recalls of pet food and toys are overblown, said industry experts addressing “Food and Products from China:  The Issue of Safety Compliance.”

A 2007 Reuters/Zogby poll found that 78% of Americans were worried about the safety of Chinese imports, noted Clarence Kwan, National Managing Partner of the Chinese Services Group at Deloitte LLP.  Nearly a quarter said that they had stopped buying Chinese goods. With China the number one supplier of toys, seafood and tires, this erosion of consumer confidence comes at a great price for all who import Chinese products, Kwan added.

Many suppliers from China were asking whether the recall frenzy [in the U.S.] was related to politics or anti-China sentiment,” said Charles Woo, CEO of Megatoys, a toy importer.  To deal with his own public relations problem, even though Megatoys never had a recall, Woo took the precaution of reviewing every step of his supply process in China.  “Consumer confidence takes a long time to develop, but it can go away overnight.” 

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Educators Find Chinese Universities Lacking from a Global Perspective

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May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

A panel of educators with extensive experience collaborating with universities in China assessed the current state of Chinese higher education and recent experiments with globalization at the Annual Conference.  Evaluating the Chinese educational system with international standards, the panelists found much to criticize, in spite of the great progress that has been made since the Cultural Revolution.

China’s educational growing pains are due in part to the rapid expansion of university education.  Google China President Kai-Fu Lee noted that in 1999, there were only 3 million college students. The Chinese government made a conscious decision to expand educational opportunities, and by 2008, there were 27 million students in higher education, counting both the 17 million enrolled in regular universities and the 10 million who attended private universities and vocational schools or were foreign students. 

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China’s Path to Sustainable Development

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May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

“Man and Environment:  Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Sustainability” highlighted China’s serious challenges in attaining sustainable development. 

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Moderator Calvin Tsao with panelists Dan Greenbaum, Hu Tao, Peter Rowe, and Gary Lawrence

What is sustainability?  Peter Rowe, a professor of architecture and urban design at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, defined it as “processes for balancing human needs for economic and social development with the need to conserve natural and built environments so that these needs can be balanced indefinitely.”  Another way to look at it is the balance between the economy, the environment and social equity. 

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Committee Honors China’s Most Accomplished Diplomat, Qian Qichen, at Beijing Conference

Former Vice Premier Qian Qichen was the distinguished guest and honoree at the gala dinner for Bridge to Change II, the Committee’s Second Greater China Conference, held at the China World Hotel in Beijing on November 26. Four hundred guests were present.

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Introduced by Committee Chairman John L. Fugh as “China’s most successful foreign minister in recent memory,” Qian was China’s Foreign Minister for the pivotal decade of 1988- 1998. “He believed that China and the U.S. could reconcile differences through dialogue, he emphasized cooperation, avoided conflict, and sought a win-win solution,” said Fugh. Qian guided Chinese foreign policy at a time when China’s international reputation took a plunge with the government’s response to the 1989 Tiananmen Square democracy movement, resolved various trade and human rights disputes, and ended his tenure with the exchange of visits between President Jiang Zemin and President Bill Clinton in 1997 and 1998. In a prepared statement, Qian said he was “deeply grateful for the Committee of 100’s recognition,” and he noted that “the development of China-U.S. relations is not possible without the support and participation of Chinese Americans.”

A major address on China’s foreign relations was given by Zhang Yesui, Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs at the gala dinner. In the 35 years since President Nixon’s visit to China and the signing of the Shanghai Communiqué, “Taiwan remains the most important and most sensitive issue in China-U.S. relations,” said Zhang. “This year and the next year are a high-risk period for relations across the Taiwan Straits.” He urged the U.S. to “adopt a more clear-cut position and take more forceful steps and work with China to block Chen Shui-bian’s path toward ‘Taiwan independence’ . . . “

Among the special guests present at the gala were Deputy Chief of Mission of the U.S. Embassy in China Daniel Picutta; Vice Chairman of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference C.H. Tung; Chairman of the National Council for Social Security Fund Xiang Huaicheng; Vice Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National People’s Congress Lu Congmin; Bjconfcai
Director of the Information Office of the State Council Cai Wu; Vice Minister of Education Wu Qidi; and the former Chinese Ambassador to the U.S. Li Daoyu.

The Beijing conference attracted a wide variety of sponsors, the most prominent being Golden Eagle (Roger Wang); Hang Lung Properties (Ronnie Chan); Gina Lin and David Chu; the Business School of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Forbes China; and United Air Lines.

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Panels, mostly in English but with simultaneous translation provided in both Chinese and English, focused on topics of interest to the international business community. Among the most popular was “China’s Capital Markets: Going Global,” which was closed to media coverage and featured Gao Xiqing, General Manager of China Investment Corporation, a government company formed to invest $200 billion of China’s foreign exchange holdings. Other panels covered corporate social responsibility, energy security and environmental responsibility, China’s new media, and the U.S. presidential race Bjconfqian
(with three American political commentators—David Brooks, Charles Cook and Juan Williams). Over 20 media organizations covered the conference, including Beijing Youth Daily, People’s Daily, Sina, Sohu, and CCTV.

Members and sponsors were treated to a dinner and moonlight tour hosted by Ronnie Chan and organized by Happy Harun, China Heritage Fund Director, at the Garden of the Palace of Established Happiness of Emperor Qian Long in the Forbidden City. The garden is a magnificent reconstruction project undertaken by Chan’s China Heritage Fund. Calvin Tsao, the architect who designed the elegant, modern interiors of this garden complex, was present as was Cheng Siwei, NPC Vice Chairman and Xu Kuangdi, former Mayor of Shanghai.

A mentoring session for young professionals at Google China, a China tour for the three journalists, and a series of meetings with Chinese leaders allowed the Committee to make the most of this important opportunity for Sino-American exchange.

Bringing this bi-national conference together were the four co-chairs, Mei-Wei Cheng, Wei Christianson, Handel Lee and Kai-Fu Lee (all stationed in China), backed up by the staff–Executive Director Alice Mong, Public Affairs Director An Ping, Development Director Michael Lee, and Program Manager (Hong Kong) Maggie Liu, who is the only staff member in Asia. Topping the list of volunteers were Peggy Chau, Mike Fung, and Lily Tchen, who have assisted with past conferences and are all presently in Greater China. Event coordinators were Vivian Du, Beijing Times and Wisdom Public Relations Consulting Co., and Maggie Tsai and Elisa Ma, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.

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Committee Brings in $700,000 in Gifts for Programs

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

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This spring, the Committee, thanks to efforts on the part of members such as Stewart Kwoh, has received two major gifts to support specific programs.

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Member Roger Wang, Chairman and CEO of Golden Eagle International Group, has pledged $500,000 to sustain the Committee’s efforts to promote Mandarin in the schools and to take Leadership Delegations to China, providing a first-time experience of the country for a broad cross section of grassroots leaders who have strong local influence.

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The Starr Foundation has made a grant of $200,000 to the Committee of 100 for its Washington Engagement Initiative.  Executive Director Alice Mong with members Kwoh and Savio Tung met with Starr Foundation Chairman Maurice Greenberg in April to describe the Committee’s programs.  The Washington Engagement Initiative gives the Committee a tool to help build a constructive U.S.-China relationship that serves vital American interests.  Through the services of Williams Mullen Strategies, C-100 organizes briefings on U.S.-China relations for officials and other opinion leaders on Capitol Hill; publishes a daily China News Brief and occasional U.S.-China Issue Briefs; and organizes trips to China for American journalists.

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Committee Co-Sponsors Chang-Lin Tien Awards Ceremony; Member Frank Wu is Recipient

May 2008 | By Yong Lu and Jane Leung Larson

On March 7, C-100 and the Asia Pacific Fund co-sponsored the second annual Chang-Lin Tien Education Leadership Awards ceremony in San Francisco.  The awards honor the legacy of University of California at Berkeley Chancellor Chang-Lin Tien, the first Asian American to head a major American research university and a founding member of C-100.

The program expanded from California to a national scale this past year, and the number of candidates more than doubled.  Winners were Frank H. Wu, Dean of the Wayne State University Law School, and Norman C. Tien, Dean of the Case School of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University.  The award includes an unrestricted $10,000 honorarium.

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Frank Wu receiving Tien Award from Bob Lee.

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C100 Board Welcomes New Directors, to Elect Officers in June

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

Five new board members will serve three year terms on the Committee of 100 Board of Directors.  They replace five directors who are rotating off the Board—Nelson Dong, Robert Gee, David Ho, Dominic Ng, and Linda Tsao Yang.

The new directors are:   Chenganla

Anla Cheng, CEO of Centenium Capital Partners (New York);





Chiao_leroy
Leroy Chiao
, retired NASA Astronaut and an entrepreneur, consultant, professor and public speaker (Texas);





Clakwan
Clarence Kwan
, National Managing Partner, Chinese Services Group, Deloitte LLP (New York);





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Cheng Li
, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution (Washington, D.C.); and





Sunbrian
Brian Sun
, Partner, Jones Day (Los Angeles). 

In June, the Board will elect its officers, replacing General Counsel Nelson Dong who will retire from two terms of board service. 

The Committee now has 152 members, of whom 20% are women.  Professionally, members come from business (55%); humanities and the arts (13%), academia (11%), law (9%), government (5%), non-profit organizations (5%), medicine (3%).  Geographically, the New York area (22%), San Francisco area (22%), and Los Angeles area (20%) represent two-thirds of the membership, with 8% in Washington, D.C., 14% in other parts of the U.S. and 13% in Asia.

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C100 Arranges Meetings with Journalists, Diplomats, and Officials for Hong Kong’s C.H. Tung

May 2008 | By Tovah LaDier and Jane Leung Larson

Former Hong Kong Chief Executive C.H. Tung, now vice-chair of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and chairman of a foundation promoting Sino-American relations, was in the U.S. this spring for ten days, including three days in Washington, DC. 

At his request, the Committee arranged a number of meetings for Tung with American opinion leaders.  Among those he met were David Brooks, New York Times; Margaret Warner, PBS NewsHour; Congressman Eni Faleomavaega (D-AS), Chairman of the Asia and Pacific Subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee; and Congressman Adam Schiff (D-CA), a member of the Joint Intelligence Committee.  In addition, C-100 organized a breakfast with Ambassador Stapleton Roy, chairman of the Committee of 100 Advisory Council.  C-100 Chairman John L. Fugh and Cheng Li, who sits on the C-100 Issues Committee, attended several of the meetings.

The discussions addressed a number of issues related to China, but Tibet and the Olympics dominated the conversations. Tung gave a comprehensive presentation on Tibet and its major demographic changes, pre-and-post 1959. For example, he pointed out the large increase in population in Tibet, the educational opportunities that now exist, income growth, and economic support from the Chinese government.

According to Tovah LaDier, who is in charge of the Committee’s Washington Engagement Initiative and attended the meetings with Tung: “The major point that people raised with him is China’s "heavy-handed" reaction to the Dalai Lama. The message that was conveyed to him by virtually everyone with whom we met is that the Dalai Lama is considered a man of peace in the U.S., China’s harsh rhetoric about the Dalai Lama has had a negative impact in the U.S., and China needs to find a way to manage its highly important, complex, and difficult relationship with the Dalai Lama more effectively.”

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Committee Plans 2008 Delegations to Greater China

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

While there will be no official C-100 delegation to the Beijing Olympics, ten tickets were given to the Committee by the Beijing Olympics Committee.  Among those attending will be C-100 Greater China Vice Chair Kai-Fu Lee representing Chairman Fugh, Pehong Chen, Howard Li’s wife, Walter Wang, and Executive Director Alice Mong.

Stewart Kwoh is organizing a Leadership Trip to China for twelve national Latino leaders and spouses, similar to the 2006 Los Angeles Urban League community delegation of black leaders, which was briefed by C-100 members both before departure and in China.  The 2008 trip is tentatively scheduled for November 5 to 14, with visits to Beijing, Xi’an, and Shanghai.

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More than Three Hundred Participate in Los Angeles Mentoring Session

May 2008  By Jane Leung Larson

The 17th Annual Conference of the Committee of 100 ended with its signature mentoring program, “Bridge to a Bright Future.” Over 300 young Chinese Americans participated in roundtable discussions on career and life choices with leading figures in academia, consulting, finance, entertainment, law, public service, and science and technology, most of them Committee members. Joining the 36 members who volunteered to serve as mentors were conference speakers Michelle Kwan, Public Diplomacy Envoy, and Karen Tse, who heads International Bridges to Justice, a non-profit organization, as well as representatives of the three mentoring program sponsor companies, Chubb Personal Insurance, HSBC, and Southern California Edison.

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Congressman David Wu, C-100 member Alice Young, and mentees.

“With our unique mentoring program, we would like to contribute further to our society by ensuring a healthy pipeline of future leaders,” said John L. Fugh, Chairman of the Committee of 100.   Opening speakers for the session were Albert Yu, former Senior Vice President of Intel and an originator of the C-100 Mentoring Program; Steve Chen, Co-Founder, YouTube; Wan Ling Martello, Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Strategy, Wal-Mart International; and Congressman David Wu (D-OR). 

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Member Ben Wu and mentees.

Mentees had the chance to attend Saturday’s conference session, which was geared to the interests of young people with a conversation between television journalist Lisa Ling and figure skater Michelle Kwan, and a panel on creativity moderated by writer Adeline Yen Mah with YouTube’s Chen, piano prodigy Marc Yu, and MacArthur Fellow Julie Su.

The Committee hosts an innovative website for mentees, with personal stories of Committee members, and mentee social networking.  Go to www.c100mentoring.org.

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Committee Awards 28 Chinese Graduate Students its Coveted Leadership Scholarship

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson and Maggie Liu

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Seventy graduate students nominated by 14 of China’s top universities competed for 28 C-100 Leadership Scholarships given for outstanding academic achievement, demonstration of leadership, and community involvement.  The 3rd Awards Ceremony was held at Tsinghua University on April 8.  Attending the ceremony were members Wu-Fu Chen, Kai-Fu Lee, David Liu, Carter Tseng, Charles P. Wang and Ya-Qin Zhang, who each spoke on how they became successful.

Two new universities have joined the twelve original schools chosen by the Committee as most likely to graduate China’s next generation of leaders, with whom C-100 seeks to establish a relationship —the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China in Chengdu and University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei. 

Greater China members Lee, H.K. Chang, Paul Chu, and Carter Tseng sat on the committee that selected this year’s scholarship winners.

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American and Chinese Decision-makers Welcome Results of C100 Hope and Fear Survey

May 2008 | By Yong Lu
Over the past half year, C-100 has taken Hope and Fear: American and Chinese Attitudes Toward Each Other on the road in China and the U.S.  This unique survey, which was conducted by Zogby International and Horizon Research, revealed that both American and Chinese populations have tremendous hopes about what is becoming the most important bilateral relationship in the world, while at the same time harboring significant fears about the consequences for their countries.   Read the full report at www.survey.committee100.org/2007/files/C100SurveyFullReport.pdf.

In Beijing, Research Co-Chair Cheng Li (Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution) briefed China’s state leaders on the initial findings during the C-100 China delegation meetings in November. 

On December 10, the survey was officially released at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., with a follow-up event on the same day at the Brookings Institution.  View the press conference on YouTube at www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=9507C4F3A466DDC4.

In Los Angeles on Feburary 6, Research Co-Chair Frank H. Wu (Dean of Wayne State University Law School) presented the survey at an event co-sponsored by the Asia Society Southern California, Pacific Council on International Policy, and Asian Pacific American Legal Center.

On March 6 in San Francisco, Wu spoke at the Commonwealth Club of California. More than 100 Bay Area political, community, and business leaders attended the program, including C-100 members Kenneth Fong, Doreen Woo Ho, Bob Lee, Larry Low, Jenny Ming, Leslie T. Schilling, and Dennis Wu, and the Consul General of the People’s Republic of China in San Francisco, Gao Zhansheng. C-100 Chairman Gen. John L. Fugh delivered welcoming remarks, and Anna Mok, Partner of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, moderated the discussion. The full program was broadcast on the Club’s national radio network and can be heard at audio.commonwealthclub.org/audio/podcast/weekly.xml.

Another presentation will come up this June, co-sponsored by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

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2009 Annual Conference to Celebrate Committee’s 20th Anniversary

May 2008 | By Jane Leung Larson

As it does every four years, the Committee will return next year to Washington, D.C. for its Annual Conference, April 30 to May 2.  2009 marks not only the Committee’s 20th anniversary, but the inauguration of a new Administration and Congress. 

The Committee of 100 was conceived in 1989 by famed architect I.M. Pei to fill the need for an organization of influential Chinese Americans who could speak with a unified voice to decision-makers at the highest levels in both the U.S. and China.  By the end of 1990, C-100 Founders Pei, Yo-Yo Ma, Shirley Young, Oscar Tang, Henry Tang, and Chien-Shiung Wu had recruited nearly 100 American citizens of Chinese descent who had reached the pinnacle of their fields, spanning the arts, business, academia, public service, science and technology.  Uniting them was the desire to expand the participation of Chinese Americans in all aspects of American life and to foster better U.S.-China relations.  Today, Committee members number 152.

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Spring 2008 | Newsletter

Spring 2008
C100 Delegation Calls On Chinese Leaders In Beijing

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